DVP Training Presentation

  • The best way to deter abuse is to stop people from becoming abusers in the first place. Several approaches show promise:
    • Reach kids directly, through schools or through their parents. Teach little boys  how to treat women and how to express their emotions with words and never violence. Teach little girls that it is OK to 
    • Broad, cultural messages appear to make a difference—not just what young children see and hear, from their families and neighbors but also from their role models on television and in sports arenas.
  • Speak out publicly against domestic violence. For example, if you hear a joke about beating your spouse, let that person know you aren’t ok with that kind of humor.
  • Educate others on domestic violence by inviting a speaker from your local domestic violence organization to present at your organization, civic or volunteer group, workplace, or school.
  • Increase funding to shelters:
  • Help Survivors:
    • Listen to empower. If a victim of domestic violence reaches out to you, listen. Let her or him know that you believe they are telling the truth, and do not judge their choices. Victims often feel completely isolated and belittled by their partner; it is important to enable them to feel safe when confiding in you because eventually, they may well be able to gather enough courage to tell you exactly what is happening and to ask for help. This intervention tip may be particularly useful for hairdressers, nurses, human resource department personnel and anyone working in professions that involve having to listen to clients, customers and co-workers as part of the job.
    • Be on standby If you suspect your friend, co-worker, staff, or family member of suffering from Domestic Violence, offer to be on standby for her text or call for emergencies. Have your phone on and fully charged at all times and keep it on you. If you have a car and need to intervene immediately, make sure that the gas/petrol tank is full so you can get in and drive to get the victim/survivor immediately if need be.
    • Provide some relief. If you know a Domestic Violence victim/survivor who is being kept at home without relief, do a random act of kindness for her: Offer to babysit the children for a few hours while the abuser is out so she can have a breather; Offer to pick up groceries for her on your grocery run. Every small gesture helps provide relieve and also build the victim’s confidence in eventually reaching out to you for help (or accepting your help).
    • Check in regularly. If you fear for your friend, co-worker, classmate, or family member’s life, call or text them once a day at a random time to see if they are all right. If it’s your neighbour, keep an eye out on the house and your ears pricked for any signs or sounds of violence.
    • Be a resource. Help them find the assistance they need, whether it is legal information, local domestic violence programmes, or finding a safe place through a battered women’s shelter. The greatest danger women face in these situations is often the actual process of leaving, so finding a safe place may be key. Knowing this information beforehand may be helpful, but assisting her in the research and even making phone calls for her will also help speed things up.
    • Document! Document! Document! Document any incidents that you witness. Take note of dates, times, injuries, and any other observations. Your ongoing documentation can help bolster a victim’s courage and credibility when they are finally willing to pursue legal action against their partner.